Nothing like a good book

One of the joys of parenthood is sharing your favorite childhood things with your own children. The greatest satisfaction is like a cherry on top when they like it too. Now that our kids are well into the elementary school age, my husband and I find we have more and more that we want to share with them. Some things we are holding back until they are a little older, but they are ready for many other things now.

My husband and I are both big readers. For us, reading, both for pleasure and for reference, is a basic survival skill. Oh, the many hours I wiled away reading the likes of Beverly Cleary, Judy Blume, Madeleine L’Engle, C. S. Lewis and L. M. Montgomery! I learned so much about life from reading, and I had so many great adventures through books. Thank God I had parents who were also readers and had many books about the house (an understatement).

Last Friday evening we were considering taking the kids out to a new drive-in theater near us. I was excited because I don’t recall ever going to one myself. (I might have, but then again that might be a memory borrowed from my brother who I am sure did.) I checked to see what they were showing, and it was a movie the boys had already said they didn’t want to see (a girl movie).

Fortunately, we are able to stream Netflix on our television so my husband and I started looking for a choice kid film. In memory of Peter Falk, I wanted to see “The Princess Bride”. Unfortunately, Netflix only offers it on DVD. Darn those R-O-U-Ss! (Rodents Of Unusual Size) We looked a bit farther and found Disney’s adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s book A Wrinkle in Time. Bingo! A story my husband and I both loved as kids!

Neither of us had seen the made-for-tv film, but we figured it would be fine for our boys. We clicked on ‘play’ and got down to watching. The boys seemed to really enjoy the film, which led to a discussion of the book, which led to going down to our ‘library’ and finding the book.

I had completely forgotten the details of the story, so it was nice to have a fresh mind for viewing. My husband had read it just a few months ago, so he was a bit more discerning. We all enjoyed it and now my 6 year old is the one who wants me to read him the book (the 9 year old thinks it’s too scary for bedtime).

Our boys love reading and books already, so we are thrilled that they are getting hooked into an author that we both love. I foresee many days and nights of good reading to come!

What books/stories did you love as a kid?
Have you shared them with your child(ren)/grandchild(ren)?
Have you read any of the books they are reading? 

Giving thanks for little gifts:

331. sharing favorite stories with receptive sons

332. the way overcast, rainy skies make the colors of nature so much richer, so saturated

333. collecting artwork and items to take to the grandparents

334. magic marker colored toes, feet and hands

335. boys doing chores without complaining and taking pride in their efforts

336. unexpected communal singing on the radio…sounds like Taize!

337. jazz quartet in worship last week

338. broccoli bursting with growth after rain

339. the boys have rediscovered playing in our basement and in the process rediscovered some really cool toys they haven’t played with for a while

340. summer adventures yet to come

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7 Responses to Nothing like a good book

  1. Thanks for dropping by my blog. I have answered your question in comments over there since I thought other people might want to know!

  2. Nancy says:

    I would have like to have heard that jazz quartet. Some great books here. I was very much into all the Marguerite Henry horse books when I was young. I enjoyed working my way through the Little House series with my kids. I went to see Mr. Popper’s Penguins with my eighteen-year old son last week and, although the movie wasn’t great, it was fun re-living the memory of having read that book together. I loved Wrinkle In Time as a kid, and loved listening to it in the car with my kids. I really enjoy a lot of Madeline L’Engle’s memoir and adult fiction as well.

    • Grace Walker says:

      Ooo, I loved those horse books too! I’d forgotten them. And MAdeleine L’Engle is just good reading all the time!

  3. I have 2 girls so I was thrilled when they fell in love with The Little House books. I read many of them one chapter at a time at bedtime before they were even old enough to read.

    • Grace Walker says:

      Don’t you just love that? I keep scouting the library and bookstores for other books I enjoyed as a kid. My list is very long!

  4. LOVED L’Engle and read every single thing she ever wrote. (The only book of hers I did not like was “Certain Women,” which was a modern day setting of King David and his many wives. Just didn’t work for me AT ALL. Everything else, fiction and non – fab.) Discovered her when my eldest was assigned “Wrinkle” in 3rd grade. Even went to a couple of places to hear her speak – what a great lady. A bit of a curmudgeon at times – but a very lovable and articulate one! Sweet post, Grace. Thank you.

  5. Grace Walker says:

    Diana,
    I always wished I could have met ML or at least heard her speak. I’m still expanding my library of her works, though I think I’ve read just about everything. It’s about time to start reading them all again. And I think I also had a hard time with Certain Women. I wish they’d find more unpublished works to publish now. I miss having new material so hers to look forward to.

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